What's Cropping Up? Newsletter

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What's Cropping Up? is a bimonthly digital newsletter distributed by the Section of Soil and Crop Sciences at Cornell University. The purpose of the newsletter is to provide timely information on field crop production and environmental issues as it relates to New York agriculture.  The current issue is below.

The latest articles are always available at the What's Cropping Up? blog. PDFs of previous issues are also available in the archive and on Issuu.

In The Current Issue:

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Organic Soybeans Yield 55 Bushels/Acre ……………. but Conventional Beans Yield 60 Bushels/Acre

Oct 13, 2017
We initiated a 3-year study at the Aurora Research Farm in 2015 to compare different sequences of the corn, soybean, and wheat/red clover rotation in conventional and organic cropping systems under recommended and high input management during the 36-month transition period (2014-2017) from conventional to an organic cropping system. This article will focus on 2017 yields, the first year that organic soybean would be eligible for the organic premium. Read more

Managing Corn Rootworm in Non-GMO Corn

Oct 13, 2017
An increasing number of dairy producers are being asked by their milk processors to seriously consider producing milk from dairy cows fed non-GMO forages and grains.  Many milk producers feel the pressure to comply with the request in order to preserve their milk market.  The decision to grow non-GMO corn impacts both the weed control program and management of corn rootworm. Read more

Low Weed Densities in Conventional and Organic Soybean in 2017

Oct 13, 2017
We initiated a 3-year study at the Aurora Research Farm in 2015 to compare different sequences of the corn, soybean, and wheat/red clover rotation in conventional and organic cropping systems under recommended and high input management during the 3-year transition period (2015-2017) from conventional to an organic cropping system. This article will focus on weed densities in soybean at the R3-R4 stage in 2017. Read more

Series: Phosphorus and the Environment, 3. Protecting our lakes: shoreline septic system concerns.

Aug 11, 2017
Phosphorus (P) chemistry is very complex in farm fields as well as streams and lakes.  Only a small portion of the total quantity of P in the environment is bioavailable, meaning that it is readily available to living organisms.  In this article two methods or tests that water chemists use to measure P are referred to: Total Phosphorus (TP) and Soluble Reactive Phosphorus (SRP). The TP represents most or all of the various forms of P that are present, while SRP is a fraction of TP, representing what is immediately available to organisms in the lake. Read more

Series: Phosphorus and the Environment 4. Greatly Improved Nutrient Efficiency Demonstrates New York Dairy Farmers’ Environmental Stewardship

Aug 11, 2017
The deadline has been looming for years: all states that are part of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed must reduce nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) loads from agricultural sources by 2025. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has set a Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) for N and P for each state to achieve water quality goals for the Chesapeake Bay region. The headwaters of the Chesapeake Bay Watershed originate in New York’s Upper Susquehanna Watershed (USW) and include part or all of 17 New York counties. Read more

Rotary Hoe Operation at the V1-2 Stage Decreases Organic Corn Plant Densities by 5.5% but has Limited Effect on Organic Soybean Plant Densities

Aug 11, 2017
Unfortunately, we were unable to plant wheat after soybean in the fall of 2016 because green stem in soybean compounded with very wet conditions in October and early November delayed soybean harvest until November 9, too late for wheat planting. Consequently, corn followed soybean as well as wheat/red cover in 2017 (Table 1). This article will focus on corn and soybean plant densities after the rotary hoeing operation in the organic cropping system. Read more

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