What's Cropping Up? Newsletter

What's Cropping Up? is a bimonthly digital newsletter distributed by the Section of Soil and Crop Sciences at Cornell University. The purpose of the newsletter is to provide timely information on field crop production and environmental issues as it relates to New York agriculture.  The current issue is below.

The latest articles are available at the What's Cropping Up? blog. PDFs of previous issues are also available in the archive and on Issuu.

In The Current Issue:

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Once Again No Response to Higher Than Recommended Seeding/N Rates for Grain Corn in NY in 2015. Why????

Published: 
Jan 28, 2016
It has been documented that current commercial corn hybrids require greater seeding and N rates to maximize grain yield compared with hybrids released in the 1990s, or even in the early to mid-2000s. Seeding rates are frequently based on yield goal, so optimum seeding rates are ~38,500 kernels/acre for high-yielding current hybrids (>250 bushels/acre) under growing conditions in the Midwest USA. Read more

Yield Component Analyses Reinforce the Idea That a Foliar Fungicide Application and Not High Plant Populations May Have Provided the Yield Increase to Soybean Under High Input Management in 2015

Published: 
Jan 28, 2016
We have conducted numerous studies over the last 10 years on soybean seeding rates. In almost all instances, we rarely observed a response to rates above 150,000 seeds/acre. In 2015, we examined the response of soybean under high input management (~200,000 seeds/acre with a fungicide/insecticide seed treatment as well as a foliar fungicide Read more

Proximal Sensing for On-the-Go Variable Rate N Application in Corn

Published: 
Jan 28, 2016
Nitrogen (N) is often the most limiting nutrient for optimum corn production. It is needed in large quantities, but because N is unstable, it can quickly be lost to the environment. In recent years, crop-sensing technologies have been introduced to help fine-tune N management accounting for within-field spatial variability, which can increase yields and/or result in better use of N fertilizer. Read more

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